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January 22, 2014
Santa Fe’s Living Wage Rises to $10.66 an Hour on March 1, 2014

Santa Fe’s Living Wage Rises to $10.66 an Hour on March 1, 2014

Effective March 1, 2014, the living wage in Santa Fe will rise from $10.51 to $10.66 an hour.

“I am encouraged to see discussion of a living wage go national and I continue to be proud that Santa Fe passed this almost a decade ago. It’s critical that our living wage is indexed to the cost of living, because increases in the price of food, utilities and other necessities are real and impact our working families. This modest increase will help our workers continue to take care of their families and not fall further behind in the modern economy,” said Mayor David Coss.

Businesses required to have a business license or business registration from the City of Santa Fe and nonprofit organizations shall pay the minimum wage to their workers for all hours worked within the City of Santa Fe each month.

The Santa Fe City Council passed a living wage ordinance in 2003. In 2007 the Council amended the ordinance that tied the living wage to the increases to the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for the Western Region for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers and also made the wage law apply to everyone working within the city limits, instead of just businesses with at least 25 employees. 

The Bureau of Labor Statistics announced late last week that the CPI for the Western Region for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical workers was announced and increased 1.4%. Santa Fe’s current living wage is $10.51. The new living wage is effective March 1, 2014 will be $10.66 per hour.

What is the Living Wage?

The term Living Wage refers to the minimum hourly wage necessary for a person to achieve a higher standard of living.

Santa Fe's Living Wage

The City of Santa Fe Living Wage Ordinance was adopted to establish minimum hourly wages.

Effective March 1, 2014 all employers are required to pay employees an hourly wage of $10.66 per hour. This includes part-time and temporary employees.  Tips, commissions, the value of health care and child care benefits can be considered as an element of wages.

The March 1, 2014 Living Wage increase is in accordance with City Ordinance and corresponds to the increase in the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for the Western Region for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers. All employers required to have a business license or registration from the City must pay at least the adjusted 2014 Living Wage to employees for all hours worked within the Santa Fe city limits.

Who is affected?

 

  1. The City of Santa Fe shall pay the minimum wage to all full-time permanent workers employed by the City.

 

  1. Contractors for the City who have a contract requiring the performance of a service including construction services but excluding purchases of goods, shall pay the minimum wage to their workers and subcontractors performing work under the contract if the total contract amount with the City is, or by way of amendment becomes, equal to or greater than thirty thousand dollars ($30,000).

 

  1. Businesses receiving assistance relating to economic development in the form of grants, subsidies, loan guarantees or industrial revenue bonds in excess of twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000) to those employed by such entity for the duration of the City grant or subsidy shall pay the minimum wage to their workers for all hours worked within the city of Santa Fe.

 

  1. Businesses required to have a business license or business registration from the City of Santa Fe and nonprofit organizations shall pay the minimum wage to their workers for all hours worked within the city of Santa Fe that month.

Click on the link to view .pdf's:
2014 Living Wage Poster in English.pdf

2014 Living Wage Poster in Spanish.pdf

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